Driver Monitoring

You have a lot on your plate to manage a business and a workforce that span multiple states, each with its own set of compliance rules and procedures. Add to that a constant stream of changes to those rules, and the job becomes even harder.

A healthy economy means many things for the trucking industry. With business growth comes more to manage: more freight to move, more miles to cover, more vehicles, and more drivers—about 6.2 million as of 2017—to keep everything rolling.

A change is coming to iiX this month, but all the good things you’ve come to expect from us will stay just the same. We’re unveiling a new logo that ties us more closely to the larger business we’re part of: Verisk.

Good news for job hunters can mean hiring headaches for employers. The U.S. unemployment rate is at its lowest in more than 18 years—3.8 percent—according to the Department of Labor.1 And many employers are scrambling to stay fully staffed.

Compliance with the Transportation Security Administration’s (TSA) REAL ID program for driver’s licenses is about more than getting onto airplanes. It also affects access to federal facilities and nuclear power plants, which may apply to anyone doing business with the government or utilities operating nuclear plants.

Affirmation is encouraging, and iiX received it in spades through responses to our annual customer survey. Almost 77% of our customers were likely to recommend us to a colleague, and a quarter rated our service as “superior,”1 thanks to prompt and personal attention, great results, and ease of use.

Recently, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) conducted tests that show strong side underride guards on tractor trailers are effective for preventing underride crashes. Underride guards are steel bars attached below a trailer to prevent a smaller vehicle from going under the trailer during a crash.

An updated iiX analysis confirms that motor vehicle report (MVR) fees have continued to increase over the past decade, during which time state registry fees reached a cumulative 50 percent rise nationwide. Across the country, the average MVR fee stood at $9.64 as of January 1, 2017, compared with roughly $6.50 ten years ago.

In 2014, in the United States, 3,903 people were killed and an estimated 111,000 were injured in police-reported traffic crashes involving large trucks. Seven percent of the fatal crashes involved a truck hitting the rear of another vehicle. In an effort to reduce crashes, a number of trucks are currently equipped with crash avoidance systems (CAS) which alert drivers to impending conflicts with objects and may initiate automatic emergency braking (AEB).

Driving a truck or delivery van is a demanding job. Fatigue and the risk of falling asleep (drowsiness) behind the wheel are just two dangers truck drivers face on the road, and those risks are keeping fleet owners awake at night.

As anticipated, it appears that the Texas Driver Monitoring Service (DRMS) is on track to launch by early 2017, according to what we are being told by the state. The program will enable both employers and insurers to monitor driving records of Texas-licensed employees and insured drivers for adverse activity, such as a driver’s license status change or a new moving violation.

Reviewing a driver’s motor vehicle report (MVR) can help you make a good hiring decision. But waiting 12 months to find out if you were right can put your entire operation at serious risk.

A new analysis by iiX finds that motor vehicle report (MVR) fees have increased an average of almost 50 percent during the past ten years. Nationwide, as of January 1, 2016, the average MVR fee will stand at $9.50, compared with $6.48 in 2005.

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